Explore Montacute House

The west front of Montacute House

Montacute House is a statement of wealth and power, designed to impress both passing visitor and local villager. When it was built, it must have seemed wonderful beyond dreams; it's still pretty impressive now.

Glittering Elizabethan mansion

Montacute House is a masterpiece of Elizabethan Renaissance architecture and design. With its towering walls of glass, glow of ham stone and surrounding gardens, it is a place of beauty and wonder.

Sir Edward Phelips was the visionary force and money behind the creation of this masterpiece, which was completed in 1601. Explore the significance of Montacute House in the article below. 

A transformed interior

Offered ‘for scrap’ in 1931, Montacute House was rescued for the National Trust as one of its first great houses, and filled with furniture and fine tapestries. From the grandeur of its Great Hall and grand staircase to the cozier Drawing Room and bedrooms, the house dignified but comfortable, and holds a special place in many people's hearts.

The longest Long Gallery

At the top of the house is the Long Gallery, the longest of its kind in England. 

Long galleries were originally used as spaces to exercise and spend time with friends, where the British weather wouldn’t interfere. When it was first built, the Long Gallery at Montacute House was also meant to be a lantern of light in the landscape – with light shining out through the windows at night. During the day, Edward Phelips, the builder, could enjoy views across the garden, over the village and out into his estate.

You'll find the magnificent collection of portraits on loan from the National Portrait Gallery in rooms leading off the Long Gallery.

View down the drive to the West front at Montacute House

Why Montacute House is special

Architecturally daring, a powerful statement from a family with political ambitions, Montacute is one of England’s most glorious Elizabethan mansions.