Discover new walks

Dundrum Coastal Path

Outside of Murlough National nature Reserve, we also look after other important conservation areas in Co. Down. Here are some new walks you might not have visited:

Outside of Murlough National nature Reserve, we also look after other areas of importance in Co. Down. Here are some new walks you might not have visited:

Dundrum Coastal Path

Dundrum Coastal Path
Dundrum Coastal Path
Dundrum Coastal Path

The path is actually an old stretch of railway which would have carried you on your trips out to Newcastle. It forms part of the Lecale Way and provides beautiful views across Dundrum bay and many opportunities to watch the coastal wildlife of the bay. Spot herons, egrets, curlews and oystercatchers who enjoy the rich abundance of foodstuffs on the mud flats.
The trail is linear and around 2.5km and is accessible by a small car-park off the main A2 to Dundrum. Find directions and more here.

Mourne Coastal Path

Walking the Mourne coastal path, Co. Down in Northern Ireland
Mourne Coastal Path
Walking the Mourne coastal path, Co. Down in Northern Ireland

This short trail is located close to Bloody Bridge, and lets walkers get closer to the mostly inaccessible stretch of coastline. Along the route you’ll spot rare plants, unusual rock formations and even the ruins of St Marys Church, reported to be one of the first Christian churches in Ireland. The route was an old smugglers run and is referred to as the ‘brandy pad’ due to the alcohol that made its way in from the coast. Spot seabirds like terns, gannets and cormorants as well as linnets and stonechats among the gorse.
The trail is linear and around 1.6km, and can be accessed from the Bloody Bridge car-park. Walkers can continue on to Bloody Bridge. Find directions and more here.

Dundrum Castle Woods

Murlough woodland area
Murlough National Nature Reserve Woodland
Murlough woodland area

The foot of the castle gives some of the best views of Dundrum Bay in the area. The small woodland area was planted by the Marquis of Downshire in the 1820s and is mostly populated by mature beech trees. In Spring, spot bluebells and woodland herbs like sorrel and primroses.
Buzzards and sparrowhawks have been spotted in the woods. Dundrum Castle continues to be an imposing structure on the landscape, built by John De Courcy around 1177.
The trail is circular at a short 0.5km, and accessible via the car-park at Dundrum Castle.
Find directions and more here.