Visiting Staunton Harold Church

Staunton harold Church, Leicester, Midlands

Staunton Harold Church is open every Sunday (from 17 April) and some bank holidays for you to explore at your own pace. Discover the history of this fascinating church and find visiting information here.

Built between 1653 and 1655 in Gothic style, the Chapel of Holy Trinity is one of the few churches built between the outbreak of the English Civil War and the Restoration period.  

At a time when churches were being purified of certain practices, including the removal of lavish decorations, the church at Staunton Harold became a symbol of rebellion. The story of its creation shows faith in the face of oppression – particularly by its creator, Sir Robert Shirley, who was eventually imprisoned in the Tower of London for his faith.  

Discover the lavish interior of Staunton Harold Church
Staunton Harold Church in Leicester, managed by the National Trust
Discover the lavish interior of Staunton Harold Church

How to visit Staunton Harold Church  

The church is open for a few hours every Sunday afternoon (from 17 April) and some bank holidays for you to explore at your own pace. Entry is free, and there will be volunteer guides on hand every Sunday to share more stories about this fascinating church. For full opening times, visit the homepage.

For those looking to learn more about the church, look out for guided tours – coming soon. Tours will be advertised on the What's On page and may be subject to a small fee. 

When you visit Staunton Harold Church, it helps us to continue caring for this historic building and its collections for many generations to come. Find out more about conservation work at Staunton Harold Church below.   

Conservation at Staunton Harold Church | National Trust | Calke Abbey

Conservation and restoration at Staunton Harold Church

Over the last few years, the National Trust has undertaken essential building and repair works at the church, to ensure that this place of reflection can be enjoyed for many years to come.