Strangford Lough

Important notice -

Our countryside space is open. We ask all visitors to follow government guidance on travel and social distancing to keep everyone safe.

A most beautiful landscape of international importance

Strangford Lough

Wildlife

Habitats

Nugent's Wood in Portaferry on the shores of Strangford Lough

Woodland

Around the shores of the lough, the National Trust manages a number of interesting woodlands. Killynether, below Scrabo Tower, has a terrific display of woodland flowers every spring. Nugent’s Wood, at Portaferry, is one of the last refuges for the native red squirrel.

A konik pony at Cullintraw, County Down

Farmland

We ensure our farmland is managed in a way that encourages wildlife. At Gibbs Island, you will see a meadow of wild flowers, teaming with butterflies, bees and other insects. Ballyquintin is one of the best places to spot Irish Hares and flocks of farmland birds such as finches, linnets, tree sparrows and skylark.

Strangford Lough

Things to see and do

Walks to Inspire

Strangford Lough

History

Strangford Lough

Our work

Sheep on the barge passing Gibb's Island, Strangford Lough

200-year-old tradition of island farming on Strangford Lough 

Rangers assist farmer in transporting 150 sheep off Salt Island in Strangford Lough, upholding a 200 year old tradition.

Strangford Lough

Get involved

A group of volunteers working outdoors

Volunteer at Strangford Lough 

The National Trust manages an incredibly large area of land and foreshore around Strangford Lough, including many islands and areas of farmland and woodland. With a team of only four Rangers, we really couldn’t cope with such a large area, if it wasn’t for the dedicated assistance of its many enthusiastic volunteers.

Strangford Lough

Things to see and do

Magical fairy carving on the Nugent's Wood Trail

Nugent's Wood gets a Magical Makeover  

Explore the new and improved Nugent's Wood trail and indulge your inner child with a walk through this incredible setting.