Explore our shop

Range of Jams and Chutneys on offer at Sunnycroft

Located within the historic kitchen, the Sunnycroft shop opens with the house at 10.30am. It offers a growing range of products that are sure to tempt you. Only visiting the gardens? You can still call in, just enter the house through the back door, located in the Inner Courtyard.

Discover a memento

Browse in our shop while soaking up the atmosphere of the historic kitchen. We have lots of products on offer to tempt you.

If you are looking for a memento of Sunnycroft we have a series of postcards, bookmarks, thimbles, mugs and magnets.

Have you fallen in love with Shropshire? Pick up an Angela Faullkner mug, fold away bag or tea set. Based in South Shropshire, Angela's designs are inspired by the county she lives in.

Take a piece of Shropshire home with you
Angela Faulkner at Sunnycroft

Perhaps you have a sweet tooth. Find a range of sweets, jams, biscuits and curds on offer.

This season we have expanded our range to include books connected to the property. From gardening to embroidery, we have something for you.

If gardening is your passion, discover therange of plants on sale outside in the Inner Courtyard. Supplied locally, the plants are updated seasonally.

While in the Inner Courtyard have a browse in our Second Hand Bookshop. Perhaps you will find something to read while you sit in a deckchair on our lawn with a cup of tea?

The background

The shop has changed function over the years. Designed to be a kitchen by J. G. Wackrill it had a coal fired range for all of the cooking.

When Offley Lander moved into Sunnycroft the range was replaced by an AGA. It was too large to fit into the Kitchen so it was put into the Scullery, just next door to the Kitchen, and the Kitchen became the Scullery. The range was removed and eventually replaced with a wood burning stove.

Joan Lander turned it into her back living room. It had beds for her dogs in front of the cupboards and Joan was able to relax, looking out on the Halliday glasshouse.

The National Trust put back the range to allow visitors to see how the kitchen would have looked at the turn of the twentieth century.