The Game Larder at Uppark

As well as catching the eye from the driveway and a point of interest on a walk through Uppark's gardens, the Game Larder was designed to demonstrate the productivity of the estate and the quality of the shooting.

Little information about its origin survives, but it seems likely landscape designer Humphry Repton was responsible for the design of the Game Larder, its octagonal layout appearing in a letter to Uppark's owner, Sir Harry Fetherstonhaugh, in 1812.

Built in two parts, the octagonal section was intended for hanging small game such as pheasant and rabbit, while the rectangular flint building was for large game such as venison. An adjacent Wet Larder, used to prepare the game for hanging, has since had its roof removed and walls reduced in height.

The interior of the Game Larder at Uppark
The interior of the Game Store at Uppark House and Garden, West Sussex
The interior of the Game Larder at Uppark

The building is orientated away from the sun and sunken slightly to help maintain a cooler temperature, while airflow throughout was aided by wire gauze on the windows instead of glass. Although no doors survive today, it is likely they would have been of a trellis design or covered in wire gauze.

It's likely the windows would have been covered with gauze to preserve airflow.
The exterior of the window of the Game store at Uppark House and Garden, West Sussex
It's likely the windows would have been covered with gauze to preserve airflow.

Adding to its visual appeal, it is approached via an ornamental path made of pebbles and deer bone, the circular pattern reflecting that of the stone floor in the octagonal larder.

The design of the pebble path echoes that of the Game Larder's stone floor.
Looking through a doorway to the Game Store at Uppark House and Garden, West Sussex
The design of the pebble path echoes that of the Game Larder's stone floor.