Visiting Black Down - what you need to know

A view south looking over the rolling downland of the South Downs from behind the stone plinth, with a charming curved inscribed stone seat in memory of WE Hunter who donated Black Down to the National Trust in memory of his beloved wife.

If you are planning on visiting Black Down here are some things you need to know before you set off from home to help make your visit as enjoyable as possible.

Black Down in West Sussex is a landscape of wavy hair grass, purple heather and pine trees, where you can still get a true sense of 'wild'. The views have inspired many for years and none so renowned as Tennyson himself: ‘You came and looked and loved the view, long known and loved by me, Green Sussex fading into blue with one grey glimpse of sea.’

Parking

There are two free NT car parks on Tennyson's Lane: Main car park (SU920308) 30 spaces; Lower car park (SU923306) 10 spaces. Not suitable for coaches.As these car parks are small they fill up qucikly.  Please respect the local residents and do not park on verges or anywhere other than in the official car parks.

Staying safe

To help keep everyone safe, please follow social distancing and government guidance when you visit. And look out for signs while you’re here which will explain any changes to how you can access different parts of the site.

If you’re showing any of the symptoms of coronavirus, or if you've been in contact with anyone that has the virus in the last 14 days, please don’t visit

For more informaiton on staying safe please see our coronavirus FAQs.

Facilities

There are no toilets or refreshment facilties at Black Down. The nearby town of Haslemere has a number of takeaway cafes and food shops.

Places to visit nearby

If you are looking for somewhere similiar with a few more home comforts try the nearby Hindhead Commons & the Devil's Punchbowl.  Here you will still find great walking and fantastic views, with a small cafe and on-site toilet facilties.

A view south looking over the rolling downland of the South Downs from behind the stone plinth, with a charming curved inscribed stone seat in memory of WE Hunter who donated Black Down to the National Trust in memory of his beloved wife.

Black Down 'Temple of the Winds' walk 

The walk goes to the Temple of the Winds. Here you can find one of the best views of the South Downs National Park. This little-known spot has a secret feel and a charming curved stone seat to rest on.