Explore the estate

The Pump House at Castle Coole

Castle Coole is famed for its magnificent mansion, set in a woodland park but there is much more to see when visiting the estate, such as the Grand Yard, Ice House and Pump House.

The Grand Yard

Explore the Grand Yard area and stables at Castle Coole
Explore the Grand Yard area and stables at Castle Coole
Explore the Grand Yard area and stables at Castle Coole

The Grand Yard was designed by Richard Morrison for the 2nd Earl of Belmore in 1817. The area was used for several purposes including dairy, stables, laundry house, candle factory and servants accommodation quarters. 

The Grand Yard is surrounded by stables and coach houses. The stables and coach houses not only housed the family’s work horses, coach horses and coaches but also had space available to accommodate visitor’s horses and coaches – Strangers Stables and Coachhouses as they were referred to on plans.

The Belmore Omnibus

Visitors can enjoy seeing the original Belmore Coach on display in the Grand Yard
Visitors can enjoy seeing the original Belmore Coach on display in the Grand Yard
Visitors can enjoy seeing the original Belmore Coach on display in the Grand Yard

Dating back from 1863, the Belmore Omnibus was used to transport the Belmore family and friends around Enniskillen until as late as 1949. Since then we have fully restored it and it is now on display in one of the original coachhouses in the Grand Yard.

Pump House

The Pump House at Castle Coole
The Pump House at Castle Coole
The Pump House at Castle Coole

Located just 400 metres from the main house, the Pump House was used to carry a water source from Lough Coole. A two-horse engine driven pump was installed and was in used right up until the mid-twentieth century. The Pump House is locaed just off the main avenue on the way up the the main house, and is located beisde the site of the original Quenn Anne House. 

Ice House

Spot the Ice House on your walk at Castle Coole
The Ice House at Castle Coole
Spot the Ice House on your walk at Castle Coole

Along the Beech Walk, the Ice House dates back to 1794. It is made of brick and shaped like an inverted cone with a dome vaulted top. In frosty weather it would have been filled with ice from a nearby pond, the ice being broken into a coarse powder, rammed down and consolidated with water or salt water. Meat game, fish, poultry, dairy produce and fruit were stored in the body of the ice or the space above it. The ice was also used in the making of cold drinks and frozen puddings.