Bats about the house

Bats

In August 2018 Chastleton undertook a series of bat survey’s which included daytime inspection, dusk emergence and dawn re-entry.

The team looked for signs of bat activity in the house voids by searching for droppings, feeding remains, oil staining from the bats fur, smell, absence of cobwebs, scratch marks and tracks in the dust.

Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) in flight
Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) in flight
Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) in flight

What was found gave a fascinating insight into how bats, a protected species in the UK, use the voids in the house. Chastleton supports maternity roosts of brown long-eared and common pipistrelle bats and day roosts of brown long-eared, common pipistrelle, natterer’s and serotine bats. The survey also suggested that the natterer’s and serotine bats are likely to hibernate in the building over the winter period. All of these bats are native to the UK.

Bats find their way using echo-location
Bats find their way using echo-location
Bats find their way using echo-location

During the dusk emergence survey, over 50 bats were seen leaving the building with 35 of them leaving from one exit point.

Chastleton at dusk
Chastleton at dusk
Chastleton at dusk

Bats will always have a happy home here at Chastleton as they are protected in UK law under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and by the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017.

Looking for some Halloween bat-themed fun?

Join us this Halloween half-term, Sat 20th Oct to Sun 28th Oct (excluding Monday and Tuesday), for a bat-themed trail around the garden. Answer the questions, reveal the secret word and recieve a prize at the end. Find out more about the Halloween trail here