Chastleton's Juxon Bible

Bishop Juxon's signature

The Juxon Bible is one of a set of fifty 'chapel bibles' printed in 1629 and is said to have been used by King Charles I in his last days. It is also possibly the bible that William Juxon, the Bishop of London, read from to Charles I on the morning of his execution in 1649.

The bible was handed down through Bishop Juxon's family at Little Compton (a manor located one mile from Chastleton), until his line died out in the late 18th century, when it is thought to have been given to John Jones II of Chastleton House. 

This story has a strong appeal, but the cult of King Charles the Martyr generated many relics and there are at least five Bibles with a similar claim. 

The Juxon Bible in the Library
The Juxon Bible in the Library
The Juxon Bible in the Library

William Juxon, Bishop of London

Bishop Juxon was born in 1582 and held the positions of BIshop of London and Archbishop of Canterbury in his lifetime. He rose from a vicar at St Giles in Oxford to Bishop of Hereford on account of his brilliant academic career. 

During the Civil War, King Charles I often asked Juxon's advice and he was ultimately selected to be with him on the scaffold to read him his last rites. 

The Library

The 4000 books and journals in the Library at Chastleton and throughout the house, reflect the interests of the people who bought and acquired them in the 18th and 19th centuries.

They cover a range of topics such as estate management, topography, literature, religion and music. 

Books in store in the Library
Books in store in the Library
Books in store in the Library

Some of the collection is much older though. Of the 14 books from the 16th century, the earliest is a volume of Macrobius's writings on Cicero and the Roman Feast of Saturnalia, printed in Venice in 1513.