Chastleton, a place of myths and memories

Welcoming fire in the Great Hall

Owned by the same increasingly impoverished family until 1991, Chastleton remained essentially a time capsule and a hidden treasure-trove for nearly 400 years as the interiors and collection gradually yielded to the ravages of time.

Chastleton House was buit between 1607 and 1612 and, with its beautiful garden, is a fantastic example and survivor of a bygone age.

The house is considered one of the finest and perfectly proportioned country houses of the early 17th century. It was built as a statement of wealth and power by a prosperous wool merchant, Walter Jones, during the early reign of King James I. 

Walter Jones, builder of Chastleton
Walter Jones, builder of Chastleton
Walter Jones, builder of Chastleton

Owned by the same increasingly impoverished family for nearly 400 years, Chastleton's last owner, Barbara Clutton-Brock, along with her 15-plus cats, eventually passed the house over into the care of the National Trust in 1991.

What followed was an extensive 6 year preservation project which included replacing the roof, lifting up floorboards, peeking behind panelling and sifting through years of built up precious clutter.

Sketch of building work project in 1991
Preservation project at Chastleton
Sketch of building work project in 1991

With associations as diverse as links to the Gunpowder Plot, the Jacobite rebellion and Bonnie Prince Charlie and as the home of the game of Croquet, where the rules were codified; there truly is something for everyone at Chastleton House and Gardens.