Wild about Godrevy

Pyramidal orchid at Godrevy

Over the last year we’ve taken a bit of time to step back to look at Godrevy. The site is a magnet for sun worshippers, surfers, picnickers, seal spotters, walker, rock hoppers, sandcastle makers, sea bathers, to name but a few. It’s also home to ground nesting birds, small mammals, reptiles, rare invertebrates and incredible coastal plants.

When you visit Godrevy you may notice that we’ve roped off some areas to give nature a bit of a helping hand. This will allow these spaces to breathe more freely, but still be a place we can look at, wander through and generally slow down so that we notice what’s under our noses and before our eyes.

Wider and more accessible paths have been created allowing you to explore the headland, stopping off here and there, with so many breath-taking views to soak up.

Accessible path at Godrevy
Accessible path at Godrevy
Accessible path at Godrevy

Under your feet are years of history and much of this area is designated a scheduled ancient monument. Archaeologists have discovered that the headland has been farmed way back in history. Indeed, the name Godrevy is derived from the Cornish word meaning small farm.

On the headland today we’ve been working closely with the tenant farmers, looking at the landscape as a whole and the changes we’re making are having a positive effect on biodiversity.

You may see the purple haze from a crop called Phacelia in the vegetable fields at times throughout the year. This flower is a great nectar source for butterflies and invertebrates and particularly for bees. It’s grown as a cover crop which acts as a ‘green manure’ for the farm crops and reduces the need for fertiliser.

Aerial view of Godrevy fields
Aerial view of Godrevy fields with Phacelia in flower
Aerial view of Godrevy fields

In other fields, the team are working towards restoring and creating wildflower meadows which will be of huge benefit to wildlife and the environment. Work has started by growing barley which, once ripened and harvested, will reduce the excess nutrients in the soil, an essential part of meadow creation. The restoration work also includes sowing hay rattle to reduce the vigorous growth of grass allowing space for wildflowers to flourish. Farming and nature have always been about balance and this is what we’re hoping to keep at Godrevy.

Wild flowers at Godrevy
Wild flowers at Godrevy
Wild flowers at Godrevy

Fewer visitors in 2020 gave the plants and wildlife more breathing space and an opportunity to thrive. Keeping to the footpaths and having dogs on leads will help give nature its space too.

Godrevy is a very important site for grey seals and we are very lucky to have them here in such good numbers. As you peer down at them from the viewing area it may seem like they’re a long way off and they may look pretty chilled out, but we ask everyone to be keep a respectful hush so as not to disturb them as they haul out onto the beach for rest and to digest their food before carrying on their journey around the coastline.

Whatever catches your eye today, on the land, in the sea, or in the sky we’d love to see your pictures of this beautiful wild space. Please share them with us by using the hashtag #NTGodrevyWild and help us take care of Godrevy.

Godrevy Small White butterfly
Godrevy Small White butterfly in old barn window
Godrevy Small White butterfly