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Press release

National Trust Cymru seek tenant for idyllic farm on Welsh coast to boost nature and access for people

A photo of Lords Park Farm and the Welsh coastline
Lords Park Farm in Carmarthenshire, Wales | © National Trust/C J Taylor

National Trust Cymru are seeking a new tenant for Lords Park Farm near Llansteffan on the Welsh coast. Set on a clifftop high above Carmarthen Bay, the Trust are looking for someone to care for the farm in a way that benefits nature, people and climate.

Stretching across 134 acres and overlooking where the Taf and Towy estuaries meet, the farm boasts white-washed buildings, grassy pastures, flowering hay meadows, woodland and a border of rich SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) coastal scrub at Wharley Point.

At Lords Park, the Trust are looking for a tenant with a passion for conservation and people, who wants to develop an innovative and diverse farming business in harmony with nature.

Nature-friendly farming is to be at the very heart of any future aspirations for the farm, in line with the conservation charity’s commitment to reversing the national decline of nature across the places in their care.

Further potential business opportunities could come from the traditional Welsh farm with its recently sympathetically refurbished, four-bedroom Grade II listed farmhouse dating from the late 19th century, an annex and wide range of traditional farm buildings.

As well as conducting repairs, refurbishments, and maintenance in preparing Lords Park Farm for let, National Trust Cymru have also begun the work of expanding and enhancing the habitats that seamlessly connect across the landscape.

A mix of broadleaved trees have been planted on neighbouring steeper slopes, grasslands have been left to rest, with the resulting wildflowers benefiting pollinators. Both habitats encourage the development of healthy soils, clean water and lock up carbon and boost biodiversity. A healthy natural environment and sustainable practices will support both nature and food production.

The farm is now ready to handover to its future custodian who will be an ambassador for nature-friendly farming and the Trust’s work and ambition as a whole. The tenancy on offer runs for an initial fixed term of 10 years.

Meg Anthony, National Trust Cymru’s General Manager for Carmarthenshire & Ceredigion said: “There is a rare opportunity here at Lords Park Farm to make a difference and deliver something special on this stunning clifftop location. Loss of nature and the changing climate are two huge threats we are facing, and tenant farmers play a vital role in helping to conserve landscapes and tackle these crises.”

“We want to find someone who will put nature at the heart of all they do in running a diverse and resilient farming business. We are excited by the possibilities, with the new tenant being crucial to shaping the future for Lords Park Farm, bringing benefits to nature, the local community and for farming across the Trust.”

The vision for Lords Park Farm further benefits people within the local community and visitors through increasing public access.

Meg Anthony continues: “As a conservation charity, we’re committed to increasing access to the outdoors. We have introduced 2km of new permissive footpaths across the landscape at Lords Park so that the people can access the farm and it can be enjoyed by as many people as possible.”

“The new paths connect with the Wales Coast Path, which could also offer potential opportunities for diversification to a future tenant from the thousands of people that walk the 870mile path each year.”

National Trust Cymru are holding a viewing day on the 17 May. Bookings are by appointment only email to wa.tenantenquiries@nationaltrust.org.uk. Full details of the letting including a promotional video can be viewed here: www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/133939904

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