Family days out at Sheffield Park

We are open for local exercise so, if Sheffield Park is on your doorstep, why not pull on your wellies and wrap-up warm because Sheffield Park and Garden is alive with nature this winter.

Explore the garden

The garden is full of some exotic and unusual trees, as well as some really old and really tall ones. In total there are 14,500 trees. Make sure you walk down Big Tree Walk to see the giants of the garden, including the Giant Redwood. Whilst most of the trees in the garden are old and need protecting, this one you can climb, although how far will you get?

You can try climbing the giant redwood in the garden
Sheffield Park giant redwood climbing
You can try climbing the giant redwood in the garden

Also head down to Birch Grove where you can find some unusual patterned barks on the trees and see the water tumbling over the cascades into the lake. If you'd like to see the trees that are particularly notable at this time of year, pick up a plants of interest sheet and map from reception as you pass through.

Head to Ringwood Toll

Opposite the garden, just at the brow of the hill on the parkland is Ringwood Toll, a perfect play area for children. Follow the natural play trail and enjoy the challenges of jumping from tree stump to tree stump, or playing on our giant xylophone. All the equipment has been made from trees from within Ringwood Toll by our ranger and volunteers, so see what games you can make up incorporating them.

You don't need to book a ticket in advance for the parkland, which is free to both members and non-members. Please do follow current coronavirus Government guidence. 

The green man sculpture at the entrance of Ringwood Toll at Sheffield Park, East Sussex
The green man sculpture at the entrance of Ringwood Toll at Sheffield Park, East Sussex
The green man sculpture at the entrance of Ringwood Toll at Sheffield Park, East Sussex

Admire the open skies in the Skyglade

Head over to the Skyglade on our parkland to lean against one of the eight 12ft panels of Sussex oak, all taken from the same tree. Placed at compass points, the panels create a viewing circle, perfect for leaning against and enjoying some cloud spotting. Even if you don't know your cumulus from your altostratus, finding shapes in the clouds is something all ages can enjoy, so look up for a dinosaur, fish or face suspended in the air. Take a moment to lean back and enjoy the relaxing sounds of the countryside too. 

You don't need to book a ticket in advance for the parkland, which is free to both members and non-members. Please do follow current coronavirus Government guidence. 

Sheffield Park Skyglade hidden among the trees
Sheffield park Skyglade among the trees
Sheffield Park Skyglade hidden among the trees

Venture down to the River Ouse

Further down from Ringwood Toll, you'll discover a little-known area of Sheffield Park next to the River Ouse. It's likely to be a muddy walk at this time of year so make sure you wear your wellies before you set off.

The river has recently undergone a restoration project which has involved removing some of the overgrown trees along the river bank, adding some berms to break the flow of the water, plus the addition of two new bridges so you can cross the river to reach new areas.

The new rope bridge across the historic lock to the island in the River Ouse
Sheffield Park rope bridge on parkland
The new rope bridge across the historic lock to the island in the River Ouse

The rope bridge takes you over Irongates Lock onto the island. The wooden bridge takes you across to the opposite bank where you can join the Ouse Valley Way path network to explore beyond Sheffield Park. The village of Newick is only a short walk away along this path.

You don't need to book a ticket in advance for the parkland, which is free to both members and non-members. 

The new bridge over the River Ouse on the parkland
Sheffield Park new bridge Ouse Valley Way
The new bridge over the River Ouse on the parkland