South West coast

Creating space for nature and people on the coast

Bird mid-flight

Joining up the coast 

When nature and wildlife can move freely between habitats, they flourish. Without this freedom, they suffer. Our coastal ambition is to join up the coastline, working with partners to make a link around the coast so wildlife can prosper.
The situation is urgent. Sixty percent of species have disappeared in recent decades and one in ten are under threat of being lost in the near future.

Walking the coast path
Managing the coast for nature
Nature is in trouble
A water vole

Sixty percent of species have declined over recent decades and more than one in ten are under threat of disappearing altogether.

Once common birds are now absent from our farmland. Butterfly numbers dramatically reduced. The large garden bumblebee has disappeared from Dorset, Devon and Cornwall.

This is due to sweeping habitat loss, development and changes in farming. The situation is likely to get worse with climate change.

This is bad news for wildlife but also bad news for us, because our natural environment is less able to provide the many services upon which we depend: food, clean water and clean air.

Farming for nature
A nature rich coast is also good for people and for making a livelihood. Some of the best natural habitats are achieved by grazing with cattle. Our aim is to encourage and support more conservation farmers producing high quality coastal beef and delivering for nature. 

Teneriffe Farm - a marriage of minds 

How is the land managed at Teneriffe Farm on the Lizard? Interest in birds and bees a must. Strictly no time-savers.

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