Discover the house

Discover the rooms of the 400 year old manor house

This 17th century manor house and estate once sat at the heart of a thriving agricultural landscape. Step back in time and find out the history of the area and how the house transformed over the years.

Visiting the house

The house is open 11 - 3 (closed 12:15 - 1 for cleaning) Saturday - Wednesday until 31 October. Please check our opening times for weekly opening. 

The history of East Riddlesden Hall

The story of East Riddlesden Hall has been shaped over the years by the contrasting influences of town and countryside, agriculture and industry, civil war and peace. The intimate 17th century manor house built above the River Aire was once at the heart of the agricultural estate of Riddlesden.

This hidden gem was saved from demolition in 1934 and allows visitors to step back in time and discover the history of the area. 

Owned by tenant farmer William Slingsby, the Airedale Heifer was born and raised on the estate 1825-1850
Lithograph c 1830 of large cow stood in front of East Riddlesden Hall
Owned by tenant farmer William Slingsby, the Airedale Heifer was born and raised on the estate 1825-1850

East Riddlesden Hall hasn’t always looked how it does today. The earliest record of a dwelling here shows a Medieval hall built on the site of the ruined Starkie wing, during the early 14th century.

Later, a building was constructed to the south side of this hall, where the Murgatroyd block now stands. When James Murgatroyd bought the land and manor in 1638, he set about transforming the estate.

He had already proved himself a keen builder, having remodelled several houses in the area.  During the 1640s he remodelled the south side of the hall to create the two storey house we see today. The building's most striking features are the two-storey porches at the front and back, with distinctive rose windows. 

Discover the features of East Riddlesden Hall
The Rose window at East Riddlesden Hall
Discover the features of East Riddlesden Hall

Discover more on a visit to the house

When the house was saved by the Briggs brothers, two local men from Keighley, it came to the National Trust with virtually no contents. Today, it has been furnished with gifts, bequests and loans to recreate the spirit of the 17th century and give a glimpse into what life would have been like at East Riddlesden Hall.

Today, visitors can still see some of the original 17th century features as well as evidence of how the property has been shaped over the years. 17th century panelling is a theme throughout the house, as well as decorative plaster ceilings and intricate wood carvings.

Look up at the intricate ceilings
Intricate plaster on the ceiling at East Riddlesden Hall
Look up at the intricate ceilings

Items throughout the house nod to the property’s close ties with agriculture, including the grain ark – a huge, oak chest used for storing grain. This is the only item which came with the property, likely to be one of the arks recorded in the 1662 inventory of the estate.

Take a wander around the house and discover more about what life would have been like here, while imagining how different the land surrounding the hall would have once looked.

Discover the huge gabled entrances of this magnificent building
Exterior photo of the Great Tithe Barn at East Riddlesden Hall
Discover the huge gabled entrances of this magnificent building

Explore the Great Barn

The agricultural story of East Riddlesden Hall doesn’t finish in the house. The Great Barn has undergone a few changes since the 17th century and is one of the finest barns in the north of England.

The barn retains many of its original features, including flagged flooring, cobble floor and riven oak structure.

How spectacular does the inside of the roof look?
Rafters in the Great Barn, East Riddlesden Hall
How spectacular does the inside of the roof look?

The barn would have been used to house cattle over the winter, as well as providing storage for food and fodder.

Today, it houses a collection of agricultural equipment including ploughs, a selection of carts and a winnowing-machine.