Exploring the islands off the Marloes Peninsula

Aerial view of Gateholm Island

The Marloes Peninsula is punctuated by dramatic, rocky islands that are renowned for their wildlife, prehistoric heritage and geology. View their silhouettes from the mainland or head offshore for a closer look.

Martin’s Haven and Skomer Marine Conservation Zone

Martin’s Haven is the peninsula’s harbour and is the departure point for Skomer Island. It's also the base for the Skomer Marine Conservation Zone, the first of its kind in Wales.

Skomer Island                   

Catch the boat from Martin’s Haven to nearby Skomer and meet the local puffins – there's around 21,000 on the island over the summer months.

The island itself is owned and run by the Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, their onshore base is at Lockley Lodge.

Skokholm

Sitting next to Skomer, Skokholm Island is also a favourite with seabirds. Around 45,000 pairs of manx shearwaters breed here, along with strong colonies of puffins, razorbills and guillemots.

The site is owned and run by the Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, their onshore base is at Lockley Lodge.

Middleholm Island (Midland Isle)

Visible from the Deer Park, Middleholm Island is just east of Skomer and is formed from volcanic rock. There are rough waters and tidal rips between the island and mainland, the hazardous stretch is known as Jack Sound.

Gateholm

Gateholm is a tidal island which is accessible at low tide – you can cross, but the climb is tricky and only for the sure-footed.

The plateau contains the remains of prehistoric settlements and its Iron Age fort was the subject of a Time Team dig. It was once connected to the land by a land bridge, which has long since been worn away by the sea.

Grassholm

The island is Wales’ most western point and is a National Nature Reserve. Grassholm is owned and run by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and is home to a huge colony of gannets.