Christmas sparkle at The Vyne

A Christmas tree twinkles in the corner of a room.

With trees twinkling in almost every room on the ground floor, from 30 Nov – 23 Dec and then 26 Dec 19 – 2 Jan 20 12-3pm, you can dive into a Victorian Christmas at The Vyne. On your journey through the house, you’ll explore the Dickensian tale of A Christmas Carol. From old favourites such as the ornate Tudor chapel to new installations such as swathes of paper roses cascading from the banisters of the staircase hall, there is plenty to draw the eye this season.


Telling the tale of A Christmas Carol, you can take a look around the ground floor of The Vyne’s mansion. With Christmas trees dripping with shimmering ornaments in almost every room, you can experience the essence of a Victorian Christmas.


Stepping into the theatrical staircase hall, with its ornate 18th-century plasterwork, you’ll be greeted by a flurry of paper roses cascading from the banisters above.  

The staircase hall at The Vyne decorated for Christmas.
The staircase hall at The Vyne decorated for Christmas.
The staircase hall at The Vyne decorated for Christmas.


On entering the Large Drawing Room, with its crimson brocatelle wall hangings, your journey through Charles Dicken’s Christmas story begins:


The story of A Christmas Carol


The book follows the mean and meagre existence of iconic character Ebenezer Scrooge.
Visited one Christmas Eve night by the spirit of his dead business partner, Scrooge is warned that unless he changes his ways, he shall be punished when he dies.

As a last chance of redemption, he is to be visited by three ghosts; the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future who take him on a soul-searching journey through time. 

Follow Dickens' tale of A Christmas Carol at The Vyne.
A candle flickers in the dark.
Follow Dickens' tale of A Christmas Carol at The Vyne.


In the end, Scrooge learns the error of his ways and turns over a new leaf. Becoming generous and jovial, Scrooge heads out to join his family at a Christmas gathering he had previously refused to attend. He also orders a large goose for his overworked clerk Bob Cratchit and his family.


Your route through the mansion


In the Further Drawing Room, silhouettes, sparkling light and shadow represent the Ghost of Christmas Past who takes Scrooge back in time to remember how he used to be.


In the Stone Gallery, garlands and greenery heartily interpret the Ghost of Christmas present. Classical busts look out from the walls onto a scene that looks like a merry party has been underway.


From the expansive Stone Gallery, you’ll wander into the intimate space of The Study. If you’re lucky, you’ll hear the Thomas Tompion clock chime and spot a Tudor squint concealed within the oak panelling.

From the expansive Stone Gallery, enter the intimate space of The Study.
Books, Christmas cards and candles laid out on a wooden desk.
From the expansive Stone Gallery, enter the intimate space of The Study.


With sense of darkness and foreboding, the Saloon located on the other side of the staircase hall represents the Ghost of Christmas Future. At this point in the story, the main character, Scrooge is forced to consider his future should he fail to mend his ways.


Stepping into the Dining Parlour with its linen-fold oak panelling and historic paintings, Scrooge is a changed person; you’ll find the table lavishly laid ready for a festive banquet to be enjoyed by Scrooge and his relatives. 


Wandering past a hidden Tudor gem, you can take the opportunity to step into The Vyne’s pre-Reformation chapel featuring Flemish stained-glass windows.

This immersive new soundscape is set against the backdrop of the chapel's glorious stained glass
Stained glass windows at The Vyne's chapel with sunlight shining through
This immersive new soundscape is set against the backdrop of the chapel's glorious stained glass


The jovial festive spirit continues into the servants’ quarters where the old kitchen, with its flagstone floor and vast empty fireplaces, represents the Cratchits’ house with the table laid ready for dinner.


Down a narrow corridor, you'll find the Larder and the Housekeeper’s Room. In the second-hand bookshop, you can recline in the cushioned bay-window seats with a good read.