Ranger highlights for autumn in Arnside and Silverdale

Picture of autumn fungi at Eaves Wood

Our rangers have put together some of their favourite things about autumn in Arnside and Silverdale.

  • Walk to the top of Arnside Knott and just stand and look at the changing colour of all the trees around the Knott and beyond. Green becomes orange and red and creates a lovely patchwork of foliage.
  • Climb up high to the Pepperpot in Silverdale or the top of Arnside Knott and see the early morning mists just hanging in the valleys below you.
  • Look out for wildlife fattening themselves up for winter – especially nice to see are the jays collecting acorns in woodlands.
  • Enjoy your own autumn harvest with the many blackberries and hazelnuts around at the moment.
  • Look out for fungi arriving on woodland floors or on tree branches – Eaves Wood is especially nice where clumps burst out from the bases of trees.
  • As the stormier weather comes in, sit on the Giant’s seat at Jack Scout and watch the murky waves come crashing in and listen to the 'peep' of the oystercatchers.
  • Look out for spiders webs in the air this autumn as young spiders move themselves through the air on the ends of the threads. Their webs are jewelled with dew too and make a perfect opportunity for the keen photographer!
  • Listen out for the buzz of bees as they enjoy the last of the year’s nectar on the ivy flowers.
Colourful sunset picture from the Pepperpot at Eaves Wood
  • Time your visit right for the sunsets across the Bay. These are a real treat to sit and watch especially from the Pepperpot in Eaves Wood. The sun slowly melts into the sands of the bay and the clouds turn yellow then pink then orange.
  • Look out for the rangers as they carry on with centuries-old traditions of winter woodland work. Sawing, chopping, dragging, burning and see ribbons of smoke popping up through the tree tops. This 'coppicing' helps to let light into woodland areas so that in the spring they are a mass of flowers.
  • Listen out for geese 'honking' as they fly overhead in their formations. Think about the long journeys they've made over land and sea from places like Greenland and Siberia to winter on the lush, damp grasses in Europe. They're sure to make you smile.