Wildlife on Baggy Point

Flying Shag with seaweed

Baggy Point is a popular destination for both visitors and locals alike, with glorious views of Lundy Island and Woolacombe and Croyde beaches. Over 70,000 people walk out to the point every year, and they share this spot with a rich array of wildlife.

Flying high
The rugged coastline is a haven for many types of seabirds. As well as herring gulls and their lookalike, the fulmar, there’s also the chance to see ‘globally threatened’ red status birds like the Shag that breed locally on Lundy Island. Common guillemots and razorbills favour the high cliffs when choosing to build their nests, and Dartford Warblers and Stone Chats perch and sing on top of the gorse. Keep an eye out for cormorants too.

Look out for grey seals on the rocks at Morte Point
Grey seals at Morte Point Mortehoe
Look out for grey seals on the rocks at Morte Point


Seals
Especially in the summer months, grey seals swim and play in the waters around Baggy Point. A good way to spot these curious creatures is to follow the easy access walk here.

North Devon Red cattle in the dunes overlooking Woolacombe
Cows in Woolacombe dunes close up
North Devon Red cattle in the dunes overlooking Woolacombe


Cows on the point
Thanks to some clever invisible fencing, four Ruby Red cattle have joined the wildlife and are playing their part in keeping this habitat diverse. Jonathan Fairhurst, lead ranger for the area, explains why the cattle are being introduced:
“Without grazing or human intervention this coastal area would become overgrown with brambles, gorse and bracken. This lack of plant diversity is not good for wildlife. The cattle break up the scrub and allow other plants to grow up, creating a mosaic of rich habitats which in turn will support an array of invertebrates, birds, reptiles and mammals.”

Hebridean sheep and lambs on Baggy Point
Hebridean sheep and lambs grazing on Baggy Point
Hebridean sheep and lambs on Baggy Point


Spring lambs
Throughout the year, Hebridean sheep graze on the rough ground around the footpaths. Native to Scotland, these little black ewes thrive in all conditions and are excellent mothers. By the summer months the fields are filled with young lambs.