Brockhampton's Mistletoe Weevils

Mistletoe in an apple tree at Brockhampton

The ancient orchards here are enjoyed by hundreds of visitors every year here. We were pleasantly surprised to find these very orchards played home to a new species of weevil in the year 2000.

Many of the elderly trees in our orchard are gnarled meaning many creepy crawlies can take refuge inside. Our trees play home to noble chaffer beetles, an emerald metallic beetle whose grubs hollow out the tree trunks. Rarely seen, it was a great discovery to find we had this beautiful beetles living here. They’re difficult to spot, but you may find their brown, lozenge-shaped droppings inside tree hollows.

keep your eyes peeled when you next visit
Part of the orchard with a wooden gate in the distance
keep your eyes peeled when you next visit

Research into the orchards at Brockhampton discovered a brand new species of beetle in 2000, aptly named the ‘mistletoe weevil’. Little is known about this weevil because they are just so rare but continuous research hopes to reveal more. Make sure you take a look close up into the green bunches of mistletoe when you visit and see if you can spot this rather special beetle.

The ancient trees here home many rare species
Mistletoe in an apple tree at Brockhampton
The ancient trees here home many rare species

Around the estate, on the driveway to the manor and surrounding the orchards you may spot large mounds in the earth. These are ant hills created by Yellow Meadow Ants, common ants which feed on honeydew from Aphids.

Impressive yellow ant nests lining the driveway
Large ants nests line the driveway down towards the manor house
Impressive yellow ant nests lining the driveway

We care for the orchards in a natural way here, to help nature thrive and to offer a safe sanctuary for all wildlife.

A Meadow brown butterfly
A close up photograph of a Meadow brown butterfly
A Meadow brown butterfly