Indoors

A mock set up of Buckler's study complete with desk

As you can imagine, there are many different aspects of caring for a 600 year old manor house. We have a dedicated team of staff and volunteers who work year round to conserve and maintain the condition of the house and keep it preserved for future generations.

As you can imagine, there are many different aspects of caring for a 600 year old manor house. We have a dedicated team of staff and volunteers who work year round to conserve and maintain the condition of the house and keep it preserved for future generations.

On a daily basis it is important the house is kept as clean and dust free as possible. Thousands of visitors every year means a lot of dust so the staff and volunteers do daily dust sweeps and floor checks to keep on top of the manors cleanliness. 

Other cleaning duties such as cleaning lights or paintings take place at less regular intervals, usually seasonally. During our open season we try and keep work light so not to affect visitors journey around the manor. Occasionally we will show ‘conservation in action’ where staff and volunteers actively clean and restore features in front of the general public, usually in a designated space. During winter when we are open weekends only ‘deep cleaning’ takes place where furniture is moved and cleaned thoroughly by trained staff and volunteers throughout the week. 

A member of staff cleans a painting with a soft brush

Every part of the manor house must be scrutinised and checked. New issues can arise in old buildings such as these cracks in the walls. 

Small problems can soon become big problems in an old house
A skinny crack in the inside wall of the manor house
Small problems can soon become big problems in an old house

It is always important to catch potential issues before it’s too late and the issue cannot be easily repaired. To help keep on top of things, the staff and volunteers fill in log sheets when they clean and report any potential problems as soon as they arise.

 We always restore items and features to keep them as close to the original as we possibly can. This involves following old recipes and instructions and ultimately avoiding the use of ‘modern materials’ where possible which could affect the authenticity and look of the house.   

Surveys and monitoring are carried out regularly throughout the manor. From major surveys which look at structural features such as the roof (the manor was re-roofed in 2017) to smaller activities such as recording light levels; all take an active role in securing the future of the manor and keeping it preserved as it is and avoiding any deterioration. 

Thanks to the hard work carried out by the Brockhampton Estate house staff and volunteers we can keep Lower Brockhampton Manor safe for everyone, forever.