The Chapel

The Chapel at Castle Drogo

The Chapel is in the undercroft and is a quiet space to take a moment to reflect.

The Chapel

The Chapel was the last part of the castle to be built. Initially, it was intended to be a large undercroft for the Great Hall to rest upon but when the plan for a Great Hall was abandoned, it was decided that this spare space could be turned into a Chapel.

The bell tower was then added onto the flat roof. This was the last part of the castle to be built and was completed in 1931 - a few years after the family had taken up residence in the rest of the castle.The Chapel was never consecrated and was used only for private family services.

Sir Edwin Lutyens

In all of his work for the Imperial War Graves Commission, Sir Edwin Lutyens is perhaps best remembered for his majestic Memorial to the Missing of the Somme at Thiepval. This is said to be one of the finest pieces of monumental architecture to arise from the terrible conflicts of the 20th century. You can find an architectural model of this memorial at the rear of the chapel. It featured at the Lutyens exhibition in London in 1981 and was donated to the National Trust by The Arts Council.

The First World War

In the Chapel you will also find a wooden cross which was the original marker of the grave of the eldest son, Adrian Drewe, who was buried at Vlamenthinge New Military Cemetery, near Ypres in Belgium. He was killed in action in July 1917.

This wooden cross in the Chapel marked Adrian Drewe's grave in Ypres.
A wooden cross in the chapel marked Adrian's grave in Ypres.
This wooden cross in the Chapel marked Adrian Drewe's grave in Ypres.

The Chapel is open every day.