Stonework restoration project at Berrington Hall

Project
A view of one of the courtyard buildings at Berrington Hall in Herefordshire

Thanks to funds raised by our supporters, we’ve been able to begin vital restoration work to some elevations of the courtyard buildings. The work will largely involve removing shaling faces of stone which have been degrading and weathering over many years. The masonry blocks behind the outer layer remain sound.

The shaling faces will be restored on a stone-by-stone basis and any loose stone will be removed. The remaining face of the stone will be ‘dressed’ to a level surface. Where we need to replace stones, Callow stone will be used, which will weather-in most effectively and was a potential match provided by the British Geological Society.

Why are you carrying out this work?

This vital project will improve the visual appearance of the courtyard buildings, ensure the safety of the stone faces and mean that Berrington is conserved for generations to come.

The old stables at Berrington
A view of the old stable block at Berrington Hall in Herefordshire
The old stables at Berrington

How long will the project continue for?

This work is expected to take approximately 10 weeks from 1 September. The work is happening in two phases; the first is a ‘shaling’ phase which will involve a tower scaffold to access upper parts of the courtyard buildings. The second phase is a specialist, finishing stage undertaken by a local stone mason which will also involve some scaffolding.

The historical significance of Berrington

Berrington Hall was saved for the nation in 1957 because it’s one of the few masterpieces of the famous architect Henry Holland to survive intact.

His Palladian mansion of 1773-83 sits within the final landscape masterpiece of Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. They were designed to work in perfect partnership, with the modestly
sized portico rising like a temple, glimpsed from within the Classical landscape.

Characterised by Classical forms, symmetry and strict proportion, the exteriors of Palladian buildings were often austere and Berrington is no different. The red sandstone exterior belies the delicacy of the neo-classical interiors; the almost complete survival of Holland’s internal scheme makes Berrington of international significance.

Berrington Hall was saved for the nation in 1957 because it’s one of the few masterpieces of the famous architect Henry Holland to survive intact.
A view of the side of the mansion stonework at Berrington Hall in Herefordshire
Berrington Hall was saved for the nation in 1957 because it’s one of the few masterpieces of the famous architect Henry Holland to survive intact.

The architecture of the mansion is compactly and intricately planned - particularly the three detached courtyard buildings which were originally service wings. These are arranged around a formal court on to which some of the principal rooms face. Originally these wings would have housed the kitchen, laundries and servants’ hall. These are the areas that will have stonework restored as part of this project.

The historical significance of Berrington means this project is vital to ensure we continue to look after and preserve this special place for generations to come.

Getting involved

Your support is vital and is helping us to care for this special place - thank you. We’re a charity and rely on donations; you can give £5 by texting TRUST to 70515. 

Don't forget to download our Berrington Hall Spotters Guide to Stonework and Architecture (PDF / 3.5MB) download and our Berrington Hall stonework trail for children (PDF / 0.7MB) download , which you can take a look at before your visit or download on the day. Remember to book your visit in advance by heading to the What's On section of our website.