The ‘Lost Hamlet of Croome’

section of a map by Doharty

This exhibition has now concluded - September 2019

This year the National Trust are marking the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre with a programme entitled People’s Landscapes that explores the role our own places have played in social change. 

No corner of the UK has been untouched by human activity. Whether it’s the towns and cities we live in or the wild places we go to escape, our landscapes have all been shaped by people and, in turn, have changed the course of our national histories.

Here at Croome we will be telling a lesser known story about the parkland through archaeology, visual art and performance.

Sam Gold was one of the lesser known residents of the 18th century who once lived within the Croome parkland.

Croome is a place where people’s voices have an important role in defining how we tell our stories.  Croome works directly with artists and audiences to find new, innovative and exciting ways to tell historic stories, where better to do this than in a place that’s important enough to be preserved for the nation.  We are delighted to be working with Steve Wilson and Sarah Edwards to find ways to tell the story of the history of Croome.  Working with artists help’s us to see and experience Croome in new and different ways, we are delighted to be working with Steve Wilson and Sarah Edwards, professional artists who live in Worcestershire.

How our visitors got involved

The project began with visitors having the opportunity to take part in archaeology.

They were able to spend two hours with a professional archaeologist excavating their own trench seeing if they could find evidence of lost buildings which once stood within the parkland.

Children digging for the lost hamlet
children digging for the lost hamlet of croome
Children digging for the lost hamlet

The ‘Lost Hamlet of Croome’

A visual and performance installation by Steve Wilson and Sarah Edwards which tells the story of the ‘Lost Hamlet of Croome’ and its inhabitants.

Over the past six months, the artistic team have worked with the team at Croome to find out more about this little know era.  From this research, the artistic team have created an installation representing where the hamlet may have been and a performance to bring some of the characters to life.

Part of the Lost Hamlet of Croome art installation
an apple in a tree part of the lost hamlet of croome art installation
Part of the Lost Hamlet of Croome art installation

There will also be performances to bring some of the characters to life.

Sam Gold was one of the lesser known residents of the 18th century who once lived within the Croome parkland.

Join us as we reimagine Sam’s world and uncover the lost hamlet of Croome.

Steve Wilson as 'Sam Gold'
steve wilson artist
Steve Wilson as 'Sam Gold'

Performances will be held on site on 7, 9, 11, 16, 17 and 18 August parkland at 11am and 2pm.