Blossom nature activities for older children

Kirstie Rogers, Education volunteer Kirstie Rogers Education volunteer
Blossom in the gardens of Sizergh

Here are some spring nature activities for older children using blossom to create artworks and experiments. Blossom season doesn't last long, we need to catch it before it falls.

These activities are designed to be done on in your own garden or whilst on a walk from your home. Whilst on your walk, please observe the government's social distancing guidelines. Remember to wash your hands after handling all plant material and do not put anything in your mouth, or near your face

Frozen blossom  (50 things to do before you're 11¾ - No.18 Create some wild art)

Collect some blossom petals and a few small twigs and leaves from your garden, or on your walk - but not too many, the plant needs them to grow. Remember to wash your hands after handling all plant material and do not put anything in your mouth or near your face.

Make a blossom ice sculpture

  1. At home, put your blossom collection into a small plastic pot - recycle a yoghurt pot, or if you have any individual silicone cake or muffin cases, you could use those.
  2. Arrange your blossom collection into a pattern in the container.
  3. Now pour cold water into the container until it covers your treasures (a couple of centimetres should be enough).
  4. Carefully place your container into a freezer and leave overnight until it has frozen solid. 

Tip: If you add a loop of string, partly in the water, part outside the container before you freeze it, you can hang up your blossom ice sculpture later.

A bee on apple blossom
A bee on apple blossom
A bee on apple blossom

Observe the changes:

The next day take the container out of the freezer and un-mould the blossom ice sculpture. 

  • I wonder what has happened to the water? Why?
  • Take your frozen blossom sculpture outside and put it in the garden. 
  • If you added string, hang it somewhere you can see it.
  • I wonder if it will make a difference if you put it in the sun or the shade?

Keep checking it.

  • I wonder what will happen now? Why?
  • How long does it take for the ice to start to melt?
  • How long does it take for it to melt completely?
  • Has the blossom changed?
  • I wonder what has happened to the ice? What has changed?

Blossom ice sculpture experiment

  1. Record the time when you take the blossom ice sculpture out of the freezer and put it in the garden.
  2. Measure the blossom ice sculpture and record the measurement.
  3. Then check and measure it again at intervals - try every 5 to 10 minutes.
  4. You could take photographs too.
  5. Record your findings and turn the data you have recorded into a chart or graph.
  6. How long did it take to melt altogether? Was the rate of change constant?
  7. I wonder what might alter the rate of change?
  8. You could set up a series of ice sculptures in different parts of the garden and see if you spot any differences. What could cause the ice to melt more quickly/slowly? 
  9. Think about surfaces, temperature, shade, light.

Think about what you would need to do to make it a fair test.

If you have a go at any of these activities, share your pics with us using the hashtag #blossomwatch and get in touch using our social media channels below.