The story of Nostell

Nostell mansion from the East side

From money made through the London textile industry to the construction of a Georgian masterpiece, generations of the Winn family created this Yorkshire treasure house to advance their social status. Unravel the four distinct chapters that define Nostell's history.

What is this place? Why was it built?

Nostell is one of the great houses of the north of England. It was created not simply as a home, but also to send out an important message about the Winn family who owned it. 

The Winns originally made money from the London textile trade during the Tudor period. During the following century the family used their wealth to invest in property and land. This included the Nostell estate in Yorkshire, which was bought in 1654. Owning land brought the family new and regular income. In a society that valued land ownership above all else, it also brought status. 

By the early 18th century the family had been knighted and were firmly members of the gentry class. They now wanted to replace their existing home with a fashionable new house that could show off and add to this status. 

The results were spectacular. The cost was huge.

The Winn family emblem, the spread eagle, can be seen throughout the treasure house they created
The Winn family crest at Nostell, West Yorkshire
The Winn family emblem, the spread eagle, can be seen throughout the treasure house they created

An ambition too far?

Most of Nostell was designed and built by two generations of Winns between c.1727 and 1785. 

The main structure of the house was created for the 4th baronet Sir Rowland Winn as a replacement for an older house already on the estate.  The work was overseen by architect James Paine from the mid-1730s and follows a symmetrical and relatively plain design known as Palladianism. This was fashionable in the early 18th century and was thought to express order and stability. 

The 4th baronet, Sir Rowland Winn of Nostell
Portrait of the 4th baronet Rowland Winn at Nostell, West Yorkshire
The 4th baronet, Sir Rowland Winn of Nostell


Building a grand house in the latest design was not only an expression of good taste. It was probably also intended to support Winn’s early political ambitions in the region by acting as a place to entertain and impress. Winn was never elected and the scale and cost of the work meant the house was far from complete by the time the 4th baronet died in 1765.

One visitor to Nostell in 1761 described how she “passed through several unfinished, faded rooms”. 

Nostell was inherited by the 5th baronet (also called Sir Rowland Winn) and his wife, Swiss heiress Sabine d'Hervart. They picked up the project with new vigour, employing fashionable architect Robert Adam and leading craftsmen such as Thomas Chippendale and Joseph Rose. Designs were updated and expanded, particularly after the birth of a son and heir in 1775. Lack of money again slowed progress and work came to an abrupt end with the 5th baronet’s death in a carriage accident in 1785. 

Sir Rowland Winn 5th Baronet and his wife Sabine Louise D'Hervart
Oil painting of Sir Rowland Winn and his wife at Nostell Priory, West Yorkshire
Sir Rowland Winn 5th Baronet and his wife Sabine Louise D'Hervart

“A burden since it was built”

With the death of the 5th baronet, Nostell was left a grand, but unfinished vision. Many rooms were undecorated and shut up. A plan by Adam for four new wings had got no further than the empty shell of one. 

The turn of the century saw a complex family soap opera play out. The baronetcy died out and Nostell was eventually inherited in 1817 by Rowland and Sabine’s grandson, Charles Winn. Winn had part of the house redecorated, but he had neither the money nor interest to complete the major building plans of the previous century – indeed he thought Nostell “overgrown” and a “burden”.

Charles’ real interest was in history. He bought much of the old furniture, books, paintings and objects of antiquarian interest which are still a major feature of the house today. Charles also added ‘Priory’ to the name, a reference back to the monastery that had been on the site before 1540. Perhaps it was an attempt to make up for the loss of the family title by making the house seem older and more distinguished? 

Charles Winn arranged for a rare set of Etruscan vases, which was acquired by his brother, to be brought to Nostell. They're now a highlight of the historic collection.
Etruscan vases at Nostell
Charles Winn arranged for a rare set of Etruscan vases, which was acquired by his brother, to be brought to Nostell. They're now a highlight of the historic collection.

A Vision Realised

The Winn family continued to face financial challenges. Selling Nostell was a real possibility until the discovery of ironstone on another Winn estate in north Lincolnshire. Combined with the coal that had long been mined on the Nostell estate, Winn fortunes were revived thanks to the Scunthorpe steel industry. This business success was masterminded by Charles Winn’s son (another Rowland), who inherited in 1874. He invested in repairing and refurbishing the house. 

In many ways this time marked the point Nostell finally fulfilled its original purpose. As well as being a successful businessman, Rowland Winn was a major player in the Conservative Party, rising from M.P. to Chief Whip. The house played an important role in supporting his career, playing host to everything from mass political rallies to more intimate weekends with guests of influence and status. In 1885 he was made 1st Baron St Oswald (named after the saint to which the original Nostell Priory had been dedicated). The dream of the 18th century Winns had been realised.   

Group on a tour of Nostell Priory, Yorkshire
Visitors on a tour of Nostell Priory
Group on a tour of Nostell Priory, Yorkshire

In 1953 the house was given to the National Trust, with full management taken over from the family in 1997.  From a chequered past defined by exclusivity and money, Nostell is now a place of wonder and enjoyment for everyone.