The dahlia border at Baddesley

Baddesley Clinton dahlia border

Late summer and the autumn months are the best time to come and see Baddesley’s beautiful dahlia border in full bloom in the walled garden. The border is well established and contains dozens of varieties of dahlias which offer a wide range of flower types, often with very showy, double forms in warm vibrant colours.

The work for the dahlia border starts in early December when the gardeners draw up the planting plan and start to order the new plants. Plants are then delivered to us in the second week of April. We then pot them up and grow them on for 6 weeks standing them in cold frames and pinching out the tips to encourage branching out.

The dahlia border is starting to come through
The Dahlia border just starting to come through
The dahlia border is starting to come through


The border is cleared of winter bedding plants in mid-May and the soil is prepared for planting in the first week of June, once the frosts are definitely over. Each plant is then individually staked and tied as it grows. Strong stakes are essential as the plants get very top heavy once they start to flower and constant dead heading is needed throughout their flowering to maintain the impressive display.

Dahlias create a welcome splash of colour in any garden
Pink dahlias in the border at Baddesley
Dahlias create a welcome splash of colour in any garden


Watering is done by 6 rows of trickle hose up the length of the border which ensures the flower heads are not drenched with water which would cause them to rot.

A view along the beautiful dahlia border
A view along the beautiful dahlia border
A view along the beautiful dahlia border



September is probably the best month to see our border at its best and the display is usually over after a really heavy frost in mid-November.

The dahlias have been grown in the same space here at Baddesley for nearly 20 years and the garden team have gradually seen an increase in pests and diseases. This year they have contracted a mosaic virus which causes the leaves and flowers to distort and stunt the plants growth. This virus could travel to the tubers and soil making the border unsuitable for future dahlia planting. Due to this the team have made the difficult decision that this year will be the last year we have a dahlia border. We are not sure yet what we will put in the space next summer, but we will keep you updated.