Explore the parkland at Charlecote this summer

Explore Charlecote Park's parkland in the summer for delightful views across Warwickshire countryside

Charlecote’s tranquil parkland is the perfect place to picnic, play or wander all year round. Clear your mind with a gentle stroll through the wildlife-rich meadows and tree-lined avenues.

Summer highlights in the parkland


The tranquil parkland at Charlecote, has been home to the Lucy family for over 900 years.  
With over 280 acres to explore, there are some beautiful walks to enjoy, that take you past veteran trees, views of Hampton Lucy Church, down tree lined avenues, through wildflower meadows and along the rivers' edge to spot a huge variety of wildlife.  
 
Mid-week is one of the best times to visit Charlecote Park during the summer months. With so much space to explore, you easily spread out across the parkland, and it can often feel like you have pockets of the estate all to yourself.



Pack up a picnic


Enjoy picnics by the river, pop in to one of the cafes for a cup of tea and a scone, and browse some of the eco conscious gifts and plants in our shops.  

Bring a picnic to enjoy by the river and avoid the queues on busy days
Picnic with Charlecote Park shop goodies in summer by river
Bring a picnic to enjoy by the river and avoid the queues on busy days


Fawns and pregnant does

The female deer (called does) are heavily pregnant from May - early July and they give birth naturally, in safe and quiet spaces in the parkland, often within the deer sanctuary which is an area that is not open to the public.

The mums leave their fawns in the long grass and nettles during the day, while they graze nearby, and return regularly to feed their young.

If you find a fawn on its own in the parkland, please leave it where it is and don't touch or move it. It hasn't been abandoned and its mum will be nearby but wont feel safe to return if you're near the fawn. Disturbing the young deer could result in the fawn being abandoned which can be fatal.

The best time to spot the fawns is from mid-July when they begin to explore the parkland in small groups!  

What will you discover when you explore the parkland?
Two fallow deer fawns in summer parkland at Charlecote Park
What will you discover when you explore the parkland?


Shedding Bucks

During the summer months, the male deer (known as bucks) regrow their antlers, which are covered in a soft velvet coating that supplies blood and nutrients to the growing bone structures. By late July, the antlers are full grown and the soft velvet coating begins to shed. This is quite a sight! It can look a little messy but it's completely natural and totally harmless.

The fallow deer shed the velvet from their new antlers but it causes them no distress
Fallow deer at Charlecote Park shed the velvet from their antlers in summer
The fallow deer shed the velvet from their new antlers but it causes them no distress

Watch for wildlife


The parkland is home to a wide variety of wildlife; from insects to birdlife, river fowl including kingfishers, to stoats, hares, rabbits, and even some grass snakes! Bring your binoculars or camera to help spot some of the parkland inhabitants.

 
The parkland is also well known for its Jacob sheep and wild, fallow deer herd which can be seen roaming freely around the parkland.

Bring your binoculars

Our riverside setting is a wildlife haven and it’s an ideal spot for birdwatching. Our licensed ornithologists check nests and nestboxes and keep an eye on the birds throughout the year, producing a detailed report for us.

You'll often see herons along the river in the parkland
Heron flies along river in parkland at Charlecote Park
You'll often see herons along the river in the parkland

Caring for our environment

As part of the Higher Level Stewardship scheme we manage the grassland and rivers for the benefit of the insects, invertebrates, mammals, birds and plants that co-exist here.

We look after our ancient trees in the park and manage our rare fruit varieties in the orchard. Our annual Tree Survey checks the condition of every tree in the parkland.

Over several years we have been planting thousands of wildflowers throughout our meadows, ideal for insects and a delight for our visitors.

Enjoy the wild flowers in the meadow
Enjoy the wild flowers when you stroll through the meadow at Charlecote Park
Enjoy the wild flowers in the meadow

Flowing through the park are both Shakespeare's Avon and its tributary the little river Dene, meeting at the cascade. They add diversity to the wildlife in the parkland throughout the year and we've installed an eel bypass too.

Walking near water is proven to help relaxation and you'll find benches near the cascade to sit and enjoy the tranquillity too.

Centuries of tradition

Have you noticed the traditional cleft oak paling fencing? This is a rural craft that we're delighted to be able to keep alive. The varied heights of the panels confuse the deer so that they don't jump over the fence, although they easily could!

The family church

Your parkland stroll will bring you to St Leonard’s church, rebuilt by Mary Elizabeth Lucy in memory of her husband.

Please note that there's no re-entry to the parkland from St Leonard's church
View of St Leonards church in parkland at Charlecote
Please note that there's no re-entry to the parkland from St Leonard's church

Please note that the gate is one-way and does not allow re-entry to the parkland.