Respect your environment: Be Fire Aware

Rangers fighting a moorland fire in the Peak District

Look after the places you love by exploring the Peak District National Park responsibly, and at all times of the year, please be fire aware.

Everyone needs nature

The beautifully dramatic Peak District landscape is a place where many people live, work and play. From the moorlands that provide us with a water supply and are a critical store of carbon, to the tranquil woodlands where we can find peace from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. These precious landscapes are also home to an abundance of wildlife, from dippers diving on the Manifold river, curlew soaring over gritstone crags in the Dark Peak and red deer roaming the rugged moorlands of the Eastern Moors. By planning your day out with thought and consideration, you can ensure that you make the most of your day out and help to protect the wondrous nature and wildlife that makes its home in the Peak District.

Curlew flying over the moors
Curlew flying over the moors
Curlew flying over the moors

Be fire aware

Fires are easily started by people lighting barbeques, campfires and cigarettes, and even by glass bottles. Visitors enjoying the countryside and moorlands may not realise that they have started a fire. Although they put their fire out, it may have caught the underground layers of peat soil alight. It can continue to burn, unseen, underground for days or weeks before re-emerging to ignite the surface. Dry surface vegetation can catch light from a cigarette or the heat generated by sunshine on a bottle and then spread quickly.

Many fires sadly start due to carelessness or a lack of awareness. We therefore urge people to be in the know before they go and remember that BBQs, campfires and any other cooking equipment are not allowed in the Peak District National Park and all cigarettes and other smoking materials must be extinguished and disposed of properly and considerately.

Oaken Bank was devastated by a fire four years ago
Oaken Bank was devastated by a fire four years ago
Oaken Bank was devastated by a fire four years ago

Savvy summary

We want everyone to be able to enjoy the outdoors. However, at any time of the year when you're in countryside - whether there's a heatwave or not - please be #peakdistrictproud and keep in mind these vitally important tips:

  • Plan ahead and be prepared; follow advice and local signs.
  • Dry conditions increase the risk of fires in the countryside.
  • If you see a fire, get to a safe place, note the fire’s location and call 999. Stay safe and don’t attempt to tackle the fire yourself. You can now also report fire setting anonomously by ringing Firestoppers on 0800 169 5558.
  • Bring a picnic to enjoy and take all litter home with you. Remember, heat reflecting off glass can also spark fires. Open fires such as campfires and BBQs are not allowed in the Peak District National Park, as they are a risk to public safety and the wildlife that live here.
  • Dispose of cigarette ends safely to avoid accidental fires and take all your litter home with you.

During periods of exceptional weather conditions, some areas may be closed to prevent fires and for public safety. You can search for locations and see if there are any restrictions in place on the Natural England website.

Fire prevention restrictions are triggered by the Met Office’s Fire Severity Index (FSI). You can find out more and view live risk levels across the country on the Met Office website.

Helicopter dropping water on a Peak District fire
Helicopter dropping water on a Peak District fire
Helicopter dropping water on a Peak District fire

Look after the places you love by exploring the Peak District National Park responsibly. Thank you for your support in helping us to look after the beautiful countryside that is home to an abundance of wildlife

For more information on being Fire Aware in the countryside, please visit:

Moors for the Future

West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service

Peak District National Park

A mountain hare hides in the heather
Mountain hare sat in heather
A mountain hare hides in the heather

Thank you for your support in helping us to look after the beautiful countryside that is home to an abundance of wildlife.