Desire Lines

An art project, Crow Park, Keswick

Profile
Rebecca Beinart - An art project

What does Crow Park mean to you? Artist Rebecca Beinart is developing Desire Lines, an art project engaging with local communities around Keswick hosted by the National Trust. The project explores the connections humans have with the natural world, and Rebecca will be working with local people to get to know Crow Park from lots of different perspectives. We'll be asking how a special connection with a local green space can influence the way we think about global issues of climate change, ecology and access.

A sheet with bright graphic designs is held like a sail in the wind by the artist with the lake in the background

The Project - Desire Lines, at Crow Park

What happens when we shift our position from viewers of the natural world to cohabitors? 

Rebecca will be working with the community on this project focussed on Crow Park over the coming year, responding to the site’s history as a picturesque ‘viewing station’, it’s role in struggles for land access and the establishment of the National Trust.

This as an exciting opportunity to work with local people to explore urgent contemporary questions about our connection to the natural world, the ways that we ‘frame’ nature, a sense of place in fragmented times, and how we collectively build stories for the future.

The project will create a dialogue between the town, the park and the lake – a series of storied landscapes that hold a tension between change and preservation. Rebecca will work with local groups and visitors to map stories of Crow Park and generate future fictions as a way of reflecting on the past, imagining the future and asking what is important to ‘hold in trust’.

These co-created stories will form the basis for a series of performances and temporary artworks shared on site in the spring and early summer.

How can you get involved?

Photo of a brightly coloured sign with lake in the background

Visit the Exchange Post

Visit the Exchange Post, a temporary interactive artwork on Crow Park. There are ideas to inspire you, to help you slow down and connect to the natural world, and a post box where you can exchange your ideas and creativity with the artist

Listen to the project podcast

Project timeline
school children holding brightly coloured paper banners with striking symbols

September 2020

Pupils from St Herbert's Primary School, Keswick, explored Crow Park then recorded what they'd experienced using patterns and symbols.

A sheet with bright graphic designs is held like a sail in the wind by the artist with the lake in the background

September 2020 - banners

Local outdoor gear repair shops donated offcuts to Rebecca, who turned the patterns designed by the school pupils into a prototype fabric banner / sail / cape

A graphic showing a crow and an archaeologists trowel

March 2021

Over three sessions people used real and imagined objects as a starting point for writing, creating an ‘archaeology of the future’ to think through different time frames. In 'Eating the landscape', natural entities were imagined as portals into different ways of seeing the environment, and in 'Writing a Crow' we experimented with a new poem form, the crow, using the percussive rhythm of a crow's caw.

Who is Rebecca Beinart?

Rebecca Beinart is an artist and curator based in Nottingham. She develops projects with a focus on community, ecology, knowledge-making and the politics of public space.

Rebecca makes sculpture, installation and performance, stages collaborative events in public places, and creates public platforms for dialogue. Her projects involve long term engagement with site and evolve through cross-disciplinary collaborative research.

Through her work as an artist and curator she is committed to developing socially engaged projects that respond to participants and places (including other-than-human actors) and consider shared urgencies.

Rebecca's previous work

Rebecca is currently developing Urban Antibodies, a research project that imagines the city as a living organism, looking at sites of toxicity and vulnerability, healing and care – with a focus on plant knowledge and medicine.

Previous projects and commissions include being a shortlisted for Jerwood Open Forest (2016); Imagined Geographies, a commission for the National Trust (2015); The Bureau of Urban Wilds, a commission for UP Projects (2013) and the Wasteland Twinning Network (2012-13).

For the past six years, Rebecca has worked as the Engagement Curator at Primary, an artist-led space in Nottingham, developing a place-based programme of commissions and public events.

a figure crouches by a pan on a smoking campfire beside a wooden hand cart laden with more containers

Visit Rebecca's website

See what other projects Rebecca is working on