Thursday, 9 August at the Eisteddfod

The National Trust presents… a vibrant programme of talks, music, objects and stories to reflect on our work across Wales.

Manon Steffan Ros – Part I – 12 Stories in Time | 11am

Like many who have lived in and around Bethesda, Manon Steffan Ros grew up with an acute awareness of the troubled history surrounding the family home and business interests of Lord Penrhyn. Most notably the Penrhyn Quarry Strike (1900-03) and its tumultuous relationship with the local community whose legacy has lasted for several generations. Even though many of her peers would not visit the castle and saw doing so as a form of betrayal, Manon volunteered at Penrhyn when she was a teenager but left after being told not to discuss the darker side of its history. But Penrhyn castle is changing. Venturing for the first time into visual art. Manon’s 12 Stories use a combination of fictional writing, poetry, music and artistic interventions within the castle to respond to Penrhyn’s past, present and future. Her work is a frank and honest reflection of the ‘real’ Penrhyn story which has even resulted in her questioning her own identity, the history we learn and the stories we tell.

Bryonny Goodwin Hawkins – Back to the Rural Future | 4.30pm

Venue: BayArt, 54 Bute Street, Cardiff, CF10 5AF. Dr Bryonny Goodwin-Hawkins is an anthropologist, educator and recovering Morris dancer. Originally from Aotearoa New Zealand, she moved to Aberystwyth University in February 2018 to join the research teams for two Horizon 2020 projects. She works on rural development and industrial heritage, and is part of WISERD – the Wales Institute of Social & Economic Research, Data & Methods. Her talk reflects historically on rural spaces to explore the importance of the countryside to urban ideas of political struggle.

Manon Steffan Ros – Part II – A reading from 12 Stories in Time | 6pm

Like many who have lived in and around Bethesda, Manon Steffan Ros grew up with an acute awareness of the troubled history surrounding the family home and business interests of Lord Penrhyn. Most notably the Penrhyn Quarry Strike (1900-03) and its tumultuous relationship with the local community whose legacy has lasted for several generations. Even though many of her peers would not visit the castle and saw doing so as a form of betrayal, Manon volunteered at Penrhyn when she was a teenager but left after being told not to discuss the darker side of its history. But Penrhyn castle is changing. Venturing for the first time into visual art. Manon’s 12 Stories use a combination of fictional writing, poetry, music and artistic interventions within the castle to respond to Penrhyn’s past, present and future. Her work is a frank and honest reflection of the ‘real’ Penrhyn story which has even resulted in her questioning her own identity, the history we learn and the stories we tell.

Peter Finnemore - Soundscapes I, II & III | 7pm - 9pm

Soundscapes I, II & III is a series of episodic audio chapters to convey different atmospheres and themes that have strong associations with Wales. These audio journeys revolve around landscape, weather, farming and industry, cultural and sporting icons, politics and language, art and folk memory. The soundscapes are an audio collage relevant to the spirit of the Eisteddfod, while playfully finding new ways to connect different generations and histories. Peter Finnemore is one of Wales’ leading figures in contemporary art. He is best known for his photographic and film work that explores generational memory through his family home in the Gwendraeth Valley; memories that remain topical as much as they are historical. In 2005, he represented Wales at the Venice Biennale.