Bluebell spotting at Nymans

Bluebell wood in spring

Springtime brings with it a fresh burst of life in woodlands. Wildflower species patiently wait for their turn in the sunlight; ready to reach skywards before the trees come back into leaf. Their bulbs, full of energy stored from the previous year are nestled just below the surface.

The woodland carpeted with bluebells
The woodland carpeted with bluebells
The woodland carpeted with bluebells

Bluebells

For many, the sight of bluebells blooming is a true sign that spring has sprung. Bluebells will traditionally bloom anytime from mid-April through to the end of May. They flower after wild daffodils, wood anemones and primroses. Due to the changes in our climate, with milder winters and harsher springs, it’s becoming harder to say with any certainty when the bluebells will emerge each year.  Bluebells carpet the woodland floor and give way to other beautifully blue species such as speedwell and bugle. We see other colours blooming too, with pink and red species including red campion, herb robert and scarlet pimpernel.

Yellow celandine flowers emerging in spring

With all spring flowers it is important to watch where you step ,as they are so delicate that they can be easily crushed. It can take years for crushed bluebells to recover. Sticking to paths when you’re out walking ensures that the flowers will remain looking their best giving others the chance to enjoy them as well.

bluebells in Nymans woodland
bluebells in Nymans woodland
bluebells in Nymans woodland

The presence of these species in such numbers in Nymans woodland is an indicator that the trees were once coppiced. These plants are normally slow to spread and it is due to the regular coppicing, allowing plenty of extra sunlight to the woodland floor, that has encouraged such an abundance of flowers.