Explore Hardwick park

Stunning views, verdant landscapes and wildlife busying about their day are just some of the delights waiting to be discovered across Hardwick's historic and listed park.

Routes to explore

There are plenty of walking routes for you to try around the wider estate at Hardwick. For a short stroll, try a wander along leafy Lady Spencer’s Walk, created for the mother-in-law of the 5th Duke so she could enjoy some gentle exercise when she visited her daughter, Georgiana Spencer. 

If you'd like something longer, there are a series of circular routes across the park and beyond. You'll be rewarded with some spectacular views, gently framed by the veteran trees.

Places for contemplation

There a plenty of peaceful spots across the historic park, especially during the week before the holidays. The ponds are a tranquil spot to stop at, often with just the resident wildlife for company. 

A quiet stroll or rest at the ponds can be a real tonic
One of the ponds at Hardwick
A quiet stroll or rest at the ponds can be a real tonic

Hardwick estate, which surrounds the magnificent Hall, covers around 2,500 acres of stunning parkland, woodland, wetland and farmland. Hardwick is also a working farm, so you may see rare-breed Longhorn cattle and sheep in the park. For this reason we ask to please keep your dog on a lead while enjoying these spaces.

Lambs and their mums can be spotted resting across the Park at Hardwick in the spring
A lamb and sheep rest by a tree in the Park at Hardwick, Derbyshire
Lambs and their mums can be spotted resting across the Park at Hardwick in the spring

Many layers of history make the beautiful park a fascinating place to visit. Visit the historic and recently restored Duck Decoy and Ice House, both of which helped to supply the Hall in times gone by.

 

Bird life

In Lady Spencer's Wood, and other parts of woodland, amongst the birds you're likely to hear and see are great tit, blue tit, long tailed tit, robin, wren, blackbird, nuthatch and treecreeper. An extra special treat might be the sighting of a goldcrest.

If you're lucky, you may spot a goldcrest
A goldcrest hides in the trees
If you're lucky, you may spot a goldcrest

On the ponds we have many visitors of the feathered kind, including mute swan, mallard, Canada goose, coot, moorhen, goosander, tufted duck, and black-headed gulls. We also get kingfishers, so if you're very quiet and very lucky you might catch a glimpse of one of these colourful chaps.

See what butterflies, bees and dragonflies you can spot. Long grasses and other summer flora make it a haven for these little fellows. 

A comma butterfly basks in the sun down by the ponds in Hardwick park
A comma butterfly on a thistle
A comma butterfly basks in the sun down by the ponds in Hardwick park