Deer diary: The Attingham herd

The deer herd in winter at Attingham Park.

Attingham’s Deer Park was created in 1798 as part of Thomas, 2nd Lord Berwick’s grand improvements to the Mansion and grounds. Today, around 200 fallow deer, descended from the original deer herd live in the park.

The fallow deer herd at Attingham Park
Attingham's deer herd are descended from the orginal herd brought to Attingham by the second Lord Berwick in the 1700s
The fallow deer herd at Attingham Park

Deer Diary: Spring in the Deer Park 


During March the Rangers will begin to stop feeding the deer their ‘winter rations’ as spring arrives in the Deer Park. Please continue to help us look after our herd by keeping to the paths when walking in the Deer Park.

At this time of year you may notice the bucks antlers growing as there are more nutrients for antler development. The older the buck the large the antlers. Antlers continue to grow until fully formed throughout the spring and into the summer. As the season progresses and the antlers grow, the bucks are often described as being ‘in velvet’. This refers to the thin layer of coat and skin covering the antlers as they grow back. 

Looking across the Deer Park towards the Mansion at Attingham Park.
Looking across the Deer Park towards the Mansion at Attingham Park.
Looking across the Deer Park towards the Mansion at Attingham Park.

When undisturbed you’ll see the herd feeding, or ‘browsing’ (nibbling at leaves, bark, stems of plants to feed) at all times of the day, however their main feeding activity takes place around dawn and in the late afternoon or evening. 

Fallow deer roam the Deer Park
A fallow deer at Attingham Park standing on its hind leg to reach the taller branches
Fallow deer roam the Deer Park

 

A wild herd

Deer are wild animals, and the Attingham herd is no exception. The Ranger team monitor the herd from a distance on a regular basis as they are unable to approach them too closely. This careful monitoring gives the team a good understanding the of deer’s behaviour, and means they can identify how the herd is feeling, whether they’re hungry, calm or may have been spooked by a stressful event.

Bucks in the deer park at Attingham.
Bucks in the deer park at Attingham Park.
Bucks in the deer park at Attingham.

A love of deer

The deer have always had a special place at the heart of Attingham. Thomas, 8th Lord Berwick was particularly fond of the deer and fed them daily in the winter, with special favourites eating out of his hand. Thomas lived at Attingham from the early 1920s until his death in 1947. Following his wishes, his ashes and those of his wife Teresa (who lived at Attingham until her death in 1972) were placed at the memorial in the Deer Park, in a glade with views of the estate.

Following on from Thomas, the deer herd are today carefully managed by Attingham's Outdoor Team.

Thomas, the 8th Lord Berwick, feeding the fallow deer
The 8th Lord Berwick out in the Deer Park feeding the fallow deer
Thomas, the 8th Lord Berwick, feeding the fallow deer