Wildlife at Lyme

Lyme is home to an abundance of wildlife. From the mightiest stag to the smallest tadpole, the residents of Lyme are great in number and personality.

 

Red deer

There have been deer at Lyme for over 600 years and their presence has played a pivotal role in the history of the estate. Come and see them during the rutting season in October and witness the stags showcasing their prowess or visit in June as we welcome baby deer to Lyme.

A rather magnificent looking chap, don't you agree?
A magnificent stag in long grass at Lyme, Cheshire

Migrating birds

We are currently playing host to some beautiful birds who come to the UK in order to breed and make the most of our feast of insects and catterpillars. Birds who have travelled from as far away as sub Saharan Africa include, Pied Flycatcher, Redstart, Whitethroat, Garden Warbler, Blackcap, Swallows and House Martins. Picture below courtesy of http://northeastwildlife.co.uk/

Waxwings are one of Britain’s most flamboyant winter migrants, with their distinctive call, distinguished outline and tell-tale crest. Waxwings are normally seen in the North East but occasionally appear at Lyme until March.

A fleeting moment with a Redstart
A fleeting moment with a Redstart

Conservation is key

We check nest boxes around the estate so that we can get important data on the health of our bird populations. All chicks are fitted with a unique ring which causes them no harm and allows them to be identified if they are ever found by another bird ringer. This box was occupied by 10 Blue Tit chicks which, all being well will fledge this week. Shortly after putting them back in the nest mum returned with a mouthful of juicy catterpillars.


The Rangers are currently being trained, as a license is required to carry out nest box checks, doing so without the right training can cause the birds to abandon the nest.


This is essential conservation work that is being done by the Rangers and their hard work and dedication and your support helps it continue.

Bird ringing helps our Ranger team get important data on the health of the bird population at Lyme
Bird ringing helps our Ranger team get important data on the health of the bird population at Lyme

Ranger blog

Keep up to date with all the wildlife and park updates throughout the changing seasons with the Lyme ranger blog.

Veteran trees

Lyme is home to a number of veteran trees of different species. The oldest oak tree is 550 years old. The reason these trees are so important is because they support so many animals, insects and fungi - sometimes up to 260 species.